Distributed Systems (E)

NUMBER: 211004
SHORT: DS
MODULBEAUFTRAGTE:R: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Steffen Bondorf
LECTURER: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Steffen Bondorf
FACULTY: Fakultät für Informatik
LANGUAGE: English
SWS: 3 SWS
CREDITS: 5 CP
WORKLOAD: 150 h
OFFERED IN: each summer semester

BESTANDTEILE UND VERANSTALTUNGSART

Distributed Systems – Lecture (2 SWS)
Distributed Systems – Exercise (2 SWS)

LERNFORM

The lecture will be held as a seminar, the practical exercises on the computer will also include other forms of teaching such as group and project work.

LERNZIELE

The students should acquire a broad knowledge of the challenges that arise when designing and using distributed computer systems.
After successfully completing the module
- the students know different system models and architectures that are used for the design and classification of distributed systems. They can differentiate between different roles of subsystems and describe them formally
- the students can identify various challenges in setting up a distributed system and know the most important standard techniques for dealing with these, including their advantages and disadvantages
- the students can understand the functionality of a distributed implemented system based on its description and derive the performed task
- students can assess the ability of a distributed system to perform its task, identify the sources of potential problems and design improvements and their integration
- the students are able to evaluate and justifiably rank given alternatives for the distributed implementation of a system for a given task

CONTENT

This course deals with basic architectures and methods that enable the functionality of high-performance distributed computer systems. Such a distributed system is used to fulfill a specific task using several independent subsystems and should appear to the user like a single computer system.
To achieve this, the various subsystems must have common knowledge. Due to the distribution, compared to individual systems, a number of challenges arise that form the content of the lecture: subsystems must be able to find each other, they must be able to exchange messages, data must be kept consistent despite the resulting replication across subsystems, errors in subsystems must be tolerable and the resources of the overall system should be used as efficiently as possible so that the given task is performed with high performance. All of these components and aspects can be found in modern, Internet-based systems. They guarantee the functionality of services such as the World Wide Web, e-mail or file sharing.

REQUIREMENTS CREDITS

Passed exam and successful participation in the practical computer exercises

RECOMMENDED PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

Contents of the modules Computer Science 1 - Programming and Technical Computer Science 1 - Computer Architecture. A general interest in technical systems, the ability to structured, algorithmic thinking and the ability to grasp complex dependencies and interaction patterns are required.

LITERATURE

1. A. S. Tanenbaum und M. van Stehen: „Verteilte Systeme – Prinzipien und Paradigmen“, Pearson Verlag, 2007
2. A. S. Tanenbaum und M. van Stehen: Distributed Systems – Priciples and Paradigms“, Pearson Verlag, 2008

MISC INFORMATION

Current information such as lecture dates, rooms or current lecturers and instructors can be found in the course directory of the Ruhr-University https://vvz.rub.de/ and in the eCampus https://www.rub.de/ecampus/ecampus-webclient /